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Although we have luxurious 500 thread count sheets, noise machines, and beds with adjustable comfort levels, studies show Americans struggle to get a good night’s sleep now more than our caveman ancestors did. While approximately 48% of Americans occasionally experience insomnia, 22% say they have insomnia nearly every night.
You might seem concerned when grandpa falls asleep in the middle of the day, but it’s perfectly normal and just one of the many ways your body changes as you get older. Although young people try to get away with the least amount of sleep possible, grandparents know the value of taking a short nap or going to bed early. Once you get to grandpa’s age, your body will start to experience differences in how well you sleep and how long you spend in bed.
Getting enough sleep is extremely important for optimal health, yet about ⅓ of adults claim they regularly experience symptoms of insomnia. Plus, 10% of those adults reported having insomnia so severe that it’s been diagnosed as a full-fledged disorder. Insomnia is generally defined as having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep that results in difficulty completing your daily activities.
Within the first year, 25% more people began experiencing anxiety and depression worldwide as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, according to the World Health Organization. Although life has begun going back to “normal,” many of us don’t feel “normal.” Residual stress from years spent worrying about becoming infected and how to navigate socializing safely is to be expected. Take a moment to recognize the traumatic event you experienced and then tread carefully to address what you need to move forward.
If you’ve gone to the doctor recently and were diagnosed with prehypertension, you’re very fortunate–but you’re not off the hook. Even though your numbers are under 140/90, there is still reason to take your diagnosis seriously.
Nearly every ancient culture used feces’ shape, size, and texture to provide health diagnoses before modern medicine existed. Today, many people get squeamish and embarrassed to talk about their bowel movements, but they are still a very reliable way to investigate what is going on inside the body. If you feel off, your first instinct may be to call your doctor, but looking at your bowel movement should be number 2.
While our mantra is “age is just a number,” sometimes the body needs a little extra help to keep up! It can be difficult to eat enough foods with magnesium at any age, but when we get older it becomes even more challenging. In fact, more than 40% of people in the US don't get the recommended daily amount of magnesium through food.
Magnesium directly influences brain development, memory, and learning because it regulates the body’s N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. When the body has healthy magnesium levels, NMDA receptors only stimulate nerve cells when necessary. However, if the body is deficient in magnesium, nerve cells can be over stimulated and wreak havoc on the brain.

It’s 3:00 pm. You’re starting to feel sluggish, and your day is far from over. Your first thought may be to make a cup of coffee or crack open a can of soda for an energy boost, but there are downsides to drinking too much caffeine. Feeling jittery, uneasy, agitated, or anxious can all be signs that you’re on caffeine overload.

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