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Running is a great form of exercise for the body and mind, but as we age, we start to experience side effects we didn’t previously. When you run regularly, the repetitive impactful movements can cause our joints, ligaments, tendons, and muscles to experience more aches and soreness afterward.
Some days you hit the pavement and everything just feels right. Your stride feels perfect and you feel light as a feather. You may even experience a deep state of euphoria known as a Runner’s High. Then there are days where every move you make feels like an extreme effort and your legs feel like bricks. When you have a goal in mind or simply enjoy physical exercise, these “bad” running days can be especially frustrating.
Recovering from the coronavirus is different for everyone. While some people feel back to their old selves fairly quickly, others can experience a wide range of ongoing health problems that may last weeks, months, or years. According to the CDC, 13.3% of people who have COVID will have lingering side effects for at least one month after they’ve been infected. For those who were hospitalized, more than 30% of people have reported experiencing side effects after 6 months.
If you can touch your thumb to your forearm or put your hands flat on the floor without bending your knees, you may think that you’re double jointed. Despite the extremely common use of the term “double jointed,” it’s actually very inaccurate and misleading.
When we’re younger, we can’t wait to be older. But when we’re older, we wish we were younger. Part of the human condition, especially in western cultures, is wishing for what we don’t have and then being surprised that it’s not all it’s cracked up to be when we have it.
“If you keep cracking your knuckles, you’re going to get arthritis.” You’ve likely heard that cautionary phrase before, but wondered if it was really true. The short answer is no, it’s not. Studies have shown that cracking your knuckles doesn’t actually cause arthritis, but there are other factors that do.

Your joints are essential for independent movement, but they impact more than just the physical aspects of your life. When the body isn’t able to move comfortably, mental health, sleep, and energy levels can all be negatively affected.

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